Why Some Investors Always Profit

There Are Many Things to Learn from Those Investors Who Almost Always Profit

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There are some investors who typically lose when they trade stocks. Maybe this is even happening to you, where it seems like any investment you make instantly starts moving in the wrong direction.

The majority of investors do about average, in terms of overall performance. If the market goes up 10 percent, they might make 8 percent or 12 percent, but they're basically in line with the greater trend.

Yet then there are also those investors who seem to consistently and routinely make profits trading stocks. What is it about their approach which seems to continually pay off? What are they doing differently than the majority of people we mentioned earlier?

Well, if I had to describe their consistently successful approach to buying and selling shares, it would probably sound something a little bit like this:

  1. Have a Plan
  2. Developing Rock Solid Rules
  3. Continually Learning
  4. Stop Loss Limits
  5. Proper Position Sizing
  6. Watch Financial Trends in the Economy and Industry
  7. Controlling Emotions and Avoiding Impulsiveness
  8. Adjusting the Plan and the Rules
  9. Staying the Course

Have a Plan:

If you don't know where you're going, any road will take you there. Having a plan is important because it will keep you on track, and allow you to gauge your progress.

Only with a trading plan will you be able to identify and illustrate which aspects of your trading approach are paying off.

Which parts are helping you move towards the destination you desire?

Your plan should include realistic criteria, such as:

  • types of investments (prices, industries, company size, etc.)
  • time frame you intend to hold the stock
  • volatility (Beta) of the shares
  • risk profile (how risky or speculative of an investment is it?)
  • what degree of potential gains/profits do you expect from EACH stock?
  • which sources of information will you use/trust?

With your plan, you should keep very close track of the investments you have made, and the reasons for each one, and the results in terms of any profits or losses. This will help you see which types of trades have been most profitable for you, which in turn helps you adjust your plan further as required.

Developing Rock Solid Rules:

You absolutely must have trading rules. It will be difficult to fully express the importance of this aspect of "the new investment you," so I will simply just state it again: you absolutely must have trading rules.

For example, you decide to never invest in foreign market companies, or those which have a share price of less than $2, or are in certain industries, or have certain debt loads or revenue amounts. It could be anything really, and must be developed and adjusted over time. Keep the purpose in mind always — to protect yourself from those bone-headed mistakes we ALL make, from time to time.

Once you make a rule, you absolutely must stick to it 100 percent. You can adjust the rules as you go, based mainly on the types of results you are achieving with each type of trade.

By tweaking them as you learn and perform, you will continually strengthen your strategy and protect yourself, while you search for profits.

Always Learning:

I have been trading penny stocks since I was 14-years-old. After several decades, and leading the industry for low-priced, speculative stocks in just about every aspect, I am still learning new things every day.

In fact, some of the most important insights I have learned are actually the ones which have come to me in very recent history. I may have more than two decades of experience on the front lines of the industry, but much of the most effective and beneficial learnings have only arisen in the last few years, and in some case, even the most recent months.

In other words, your journey to become a great investor involves continuous and endless learning. The more new approaches you absorb, and the more strategies, protocols, and information you digest, the more frequently your investment approach will pay off.

Stop Loss Limits:

One of the most important and effective trading tactics is to use stop loss orders to mitigate any downside risks. Simply put, if you buy shares at a certain price, you choose a stop loss limit price which is about 3 percent or 5 percent, or maybe 8 percent, below the level at which you bought the shares. (For example, if you bought shares at $102, you might set your stop loss "trigger price" at $99).

Then, if the shares fall to that trigger price for any reason, you immediately sell. This way, you limit your maximum downside to a small amount, perhaps about 3 percent or 5 percent or 7 percent.

You can take a lot of small losses on bad trades before its going to matter very much. Meanwhile, you are avoiding the more calamitous declines which sometimes see shares falling 50 percent or 75 percent... or even 100 percent!

As well, using stop loss orders and loss limits as described, keeps you invested as long as the shares do not drop to your trigger price. That way, you remain "locked in" to the investment, such that you enjoy the profits if the shares start moving higher.

For example, you buy shares at $3 (and set your stop loss at $2.75). If the investment falls towards $1.12, you already sold at $2.75 (and lost only 8 percent). However, if it goes up towards $4 or $5, besides having protected your maximum downside risk, you still benefited from all the gains.

Proper Position Sizing:

Put simply, position sizing is about making sure that each investment you make is a safe and appropriate size. By appropriate, I mean that no aspect of your portfolio is too heavily invested in any one stock or asset.

If you have a portfolio of $10,000, and you put $8,000 into a single investment, that is very poor position sizing. More likely, a $10,000 portfolio makes sense to have 10 different investments, in my opinion. This limits each of those purchases to only 10 percent of the portfolio, while diversifying across various assets. 

If you had a portfolio of only $2,000, it would be poor position sizing to have 25 different investments. The commission rates to trade the stocks would be far too great on a percentage basis —  25 buys with $10 trading commission on each means $250 (or 12.5 percent) of your total portfolio gone in JUST commission fees. Then there are also 25 more commission charges coming when you eventually sell each stock.

Thus, to position size appropriately, you need to limit exposure across various assets so that you do not have "too much" exposure to any one asset. Take into account risks, diversification, the commission costs in terms of percentage, and the total portfolio size.

Watch Financial Trends in the Economy and Industry:

This is similar to the "continuous learning" we mentioned earlier. If you are investing heavily in a digital printing company, then you need to understand the digital printing industry, as well as assess how social and economic trends might affect the company in question.  

Likewise, if you want to be involved in biotech, you should keep a close watch on all the events going on in that industry or particular space. Same goes for oil production, air travel, consumer discretionary companies, base metal mining, retail, and so on...

Read industry publications, and watch broad-based financial data as closely as possible. If the Federal Reserve is going to raise interest rates, or the government administration is going to launch a massive tax cut, or war breaks out in Saudi Arabia, then you need to be aware of these issues and understand how they affect your investments. Significant events will affect the investments you're making, and your job is to understand the ways in which these situations will affect the prices of the shares that you own, in both the short term and the long term.

Controlling Emotions and Avoiding Impulsiveness:

This is easier said than done, but it is so important to control your emotions when you trade. Do not put all your hopes and ambitions into any one particular stock, and don't get married to it in your mind.

Investing well is boring and devoid of emotions. If an investment is not acting the way that you hoped that it would, you need to be able to dump those shares immediately without giving a second thought.

You also should not hold shares which cause you to be stressed out, or those that cause you to lose sleep! In any such event, those may not be appropriate stocks for you.

Adjusting the Plan and the Rules:

Your trading plan, and the trading rules, are not set in stone. You should develop them with a lot of thought, and stick to them of course... but allow yourself the ability to tweak them based on your trading results, and as you learn new information.

For example, perhaps you took losses on three different biotech companies right in a row. You may want to adjust your trading rules to state that you will never trade biotech shares. Or perhaps you do best with sub-$3 penny stocks, so you might apply more of your focus and resources to that type of investment.

Staying the Course:

It has been proven, time and time again, the more active you are as an investor, the worse your trading results. People tend to jump from one investment or trend or fad to the next, without giving their current investments enough time to play out as they eventually will.

Develop a plan, stick your trading rules, and have the patience required to allow your investments to produce their returns. Businesses, which are what stock prices are typically based upon, take time to grow. They operate in three-month windows, not by the hour, and not by the minute.

Even a company that is growing rapidly and gobbling up market share typically won't illustrate all the financial benefits of that until they release their quarterly results. The quarter is a three month period, and even the numbers and details from their operations does not become public knowledge until several weeks, or even months, after the end of the quarter.

In other words, you might be finding out that the company is exploding in growth, but not until several months after that quarterly period ends. Typically, many shareholders might have already sold in frustration, then watch as the shares suddenly spike higher just a few weeks later.

Ask Yourself:

Be honest, and ask yourself how many of the points above are already a part of your investment approach. The more of them you include in your stock market strategy, typically the better your final results may become.

If you want to invest like those who (almost) always turn a profit when they buy and sell shares, and you intend to do that consistently, then replicate as many of the points mentioned above as possible. There is a reason why some investors can continually outperform, and now you can see (mimic) exactly how they have that degree of success.