What to Include in a Resume Experience Section

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When you're writing a resume, the experience section of your resume provides detailed information about your employment history. This is the real heart of your resume, and the more years you are employed, the more decisions you will have to make about what to include and what to leave off in this section.

This section of your resume is where employers will look to see what jobs and job titles you've held in the past, and will give employers a sense of your career arc.

 

Writing the Experience Section 

List the companies you worked for, dates of employment, the positions you held, and a bulleted list of responsibilities and achievements. Internships, summer jobs, and temporary jobs, in addition to permanent positions, can all be included in this part of your resume.

You do not have to include every job that you have held. Entry level employees, who do not have a lot of on-the-job experience, should include every job possible. (Take a look at these examples of entry level resumes for inspiration.) But once you have worked for more than 10 years, you may find that some of your earlier jobs are less relevant to your career.

You can leave those positions off, or group together earlier experience in a very truncated format at the end of your resume. Here are two examples of how to early jobs can be listed on your resume: 

  • Additional experience includes retail sales jobs at Barry's Books (20XX-20XX), Cindy's Clothing Store (20XX-20XX), and waitressing at Muffins and More (20XX-20XX). 
  • Additional experience includes positions at ABC Company and XYZ company.

Typically, a resume will have information about your most recent 10 to 15 years of experience. Beyond that timeframe, you do not need to include details unless the positions are relevant to your current career. Here's more information on how many years of experience to include on your resume.

 

Writing Job Descriptions 

For each company you have worked for, you will want to provide your title, the company's name and location, the years you were employed, and a short summary (usually in bullet points) of your responsibilities and accomplishments.

Avoid making the mistake of simply listing tasks. You want to use this section to highlight your abilities and accomplishments. Here's more information on how to write job descriptions on your resume

There are many ways you can present the information about each job. A resume template can help guide you toward choosing a design that works for you. Whatever style and format you select, make sure to be consistent. If you are using bullet points to describe your most recent position, you should use bullet points to describe each position you have held. If you have the years you worked right-aligned for one job, make sure that you follow that same alignment for each and every position listed in the section. 

Resume Experience Section

Here is how the resume experience section is formatted:  

Company #1
City, State
Dates Worked

Job Title

  • Responsibilities / Achievements
  • Responsibilities / Achievements

Company #2
City, State
Dates Worked

Job Title

  • Responsibilities / Achievements
  • Responsibilities / Achievements

Resume Samples
Review sample resumes so you can incorporate your resume template information into an appropriate format.

What Else You Need to Know: