What Is Cold Working?

Cold working and work hardening metals

Cold working refers to the process of strengthening a metal by plastic deformation. Also referred to as work hardening, the metal working technique involves subjecting metal to mechanical stress so as to cause a permanent change to the metal's crystalline structure. 

The process gets its name because it is conducted at temperatures below the metal's recrystallization point and mechanical stress, not heat, is used to affect change.

 The technique is most commonly applied to steel, aluminum, and copper

When these metals are cold worked permanent defects change their crystalline makeup. These defects reduce the ability of crystals to move within the metal structure and the metal becomes more resistant to further deformation.

The resulting metal product has improved tensile strength and hardness, but less ductility. Cold rolling and cold drawing of steel also improve surface finish. The major cold-working methods can be classified as squeezing or rolling, bending, shearing and drawing. See the table below for a summary of the various methods for cold working metal.

Squeezing

Bending

Shearing

Drawing

Rolling

Angle

Shearing

Br and tube drawing

Swaging

Roll

Slitting

Wire drawing

Cold forging

Roll forming

Blanking

Spinning

Sizing

Drawing

Piercing

Embossing

Extrusion

Seaming

Lancing

Stretch forming

Riveting

Flanging

Perforating

Shell drawing

Staking

Straightening

Notching

Ironing

Coining

 

Nibbling

High-energy rate forming

Peening

 

Shaving

 

Bunishing

 

Trimming

 

Die hobbing

 

Cutoff

 

Thread rolling

 

Dinking

 

 

Cold rolling is the most common method of work hardening. This involves the metal being passed through pairs of rollers to reduce thickness or to make the thickness uniform. As it moves through the rollers and is compressed, the metal grains are deformed.  Examples of cold-rolled products include steel sheets, strips, bars, and rods.

Bending of sheet metal is another process for cold working, which involves deforming metal over a work axis, thereby creating a change in the metals geometry. In this method, the shape changes, but the volume of the metal remains constant. An example of this bending process is simple bending of steel or aluminum parts to meet the desired curvature. Many car parts, for example, have to be bent in order to fit manufacture dimensions.

Drawing, by contrast, essentially involves pulling the metal through a small hole or die. This reduces the diameter of a metal rod or wire while increasing the product's length. The raw metal is pushed into the die via compression force to ensure that recrystallization occurs as the metal changes shape. Products made via this process include steel bars and aluminum rods.

Follow Terence on Google+

Continue Reading...