Average American Credit Card Debt by State

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Credit card debt has crept higher each year, and American consumers began the year 2020 carrying a whopping $1 trillion in credit card debt. However, given the unusual nature of spending during the COVID-19 pandemic, 2020 is on track to end with a decline in credit card debt.

In second quarter 2020, U.S. consumers paid back $58.1 billion of their credit card debt. This means debt per household declined 8.2% to $7,938 from the $8,645 recorded for the same period in 2019.

The High Cost of Credit Card Debt

Carrying credit card debt can be expensive, especially on high balances. As interest rates creep higher, the cost of carrying credit card debt also increases. The majority of credit cards have a variable annual percentage rate, meaning the APR changes based on an underlying rate that’s indirectly tied to the Federal funds rate. Many credit cards use the prime rate as the index rate. Each time the Fed raises interest rates, credit card interest rates soon follow, typically rising by the same amount as the Federal funds rate increase.

The average credit card interest rate for the week of Sept. 23, 2020, was 16%, a decline from the previous year, according to CreditCards.com.

A year earlier, on Sept. 18, 2019, the average advertised minimum APR for a U.S. credit card was 17.61% and the maximum was 24.98%, the card data company reported.

Interest adds up quickly and varies depending on the size of payments made. A 16% APR translates into a total payment of $13,991 on a credit card balance of $5,000 if only the minimum 2%, or $100, is paid each month. That total decreases quite a bit to $6,391 if $300, 6% of the balance, is paid each month.

A Look at the Average Credit Card Debt by State

The average credit card debt varies by state. The Chamber of Commerce ranks Alaska as the state whose residents hold the most credit card debt—an average of $10,685. If only the minimum 2% payment is made each month, the amount of interest on top of the original debt would be $13,249.

Iowa is the least indebted state with $6,726 average credit card debt. The average Iowan paying the $135 minimum payment on that balance, would accumulate another $8,340 in interest charges.

It's well worth it to pay higher than the minimum to avoid interest accumulation on top of the original debt.

There are also some regional trends with average credit card debt. States in the Southeast and West Coast have a higher average credit card debt, and Midwestern states tend to carry lower average credit card debt. Salaries and cost of living could play a role in the amount of credit card debt in various regions across the United States.

Check the following table for the average credit card debt in your state along with the minimum monthly 2% payment and total interest that would be paid over the repayment period.

Average Credit Card Debt By State
Rank State Debt Monthly Payment
of 2% of Debt
Total Interest
29 Alabama $7,967 $159 $9,879
1 Alaska $10,685 $214 $13,249
30 Arizona $8,265 $165 $10,249
37 Arkansas $7,727 $155 $9,581
4 California $8,144 $163 $10,099
7 Colorado $8,463 $169 $10,494
23 Connecticut $9,000 $180 $11,160
28 Delaware $8,255 $165 $10,236
14 D.C. $8,291 $296 $2,381
12 Florida $8,363 $167 $10,370
31 Georgia $8,738 $175 $10,835
13 Hawaii $8,423 $168 $10,445
10 Idaho $7,518 $150 $9,322
24 Illinois $8,168 $163 $10,128
34 Indiana $7,393 $148 $9,167
38 Iowa $6,726 $135 $8,340
33 Kansas $7,964 $159 $9,875
27 Kentucky $7,428 $149 $9,211
25 Louisiana $8,110 $162 $10,056
49 Maine $7,466 $149 $9,258
18 Maryland $9,009 $180 $11,171
42 Massachusetts $7,994 $160 $9,913
47 Michigan $7,382 $148 $9,154
36 Minnesota $7,351 $147 $9,115
39 Mississippi $7,433 $149 $9,217
41 Missouri $7,706 $154 $9,555
5 Montana $7,444 $149 $9,231
45 Nebraska $7,515 $150 $9,319
19 Nevada $8,250 $165 $10,230
35 New Hampshire $8,252 $165 $10,232
6 New Jersey $8,959 $179 $11,109
17 New Mexico $8,323 $166 $10,321
8 New York $8,510 $170 $10,552
26 North Carolina $8,062 $161 $9,997
11 North Dakota $7,068 $141 $8,764
51 Ohio $7,654 $153 $9,491
16 Oklahoma $8,197 $164 $10,164
9 Oregon $7,582 $152 $9,402
48 Pennsylvania $7,888 $158 $9,781
46 Rhode Island $8,162 $163 $10,121
50 South Carolina $8,124 $162 $10,074
22 South Dakota $7,199 $144 $8,927
44 Tennessee $7,996 $160 $9,915
21 Texas $9,100 $182 $11,284
3 Utah $7,727 $155 $9,581
40 Vermont $7,466 $149 $9,258
20 Virginia $9,120 $182 $11,309
15 Washington $8,318 $166 $10,314
32 West Virginia $7,563 $151 $9,378
42 Wisconsin $6,737 $135 $8,354
2 Wyoming $8,199 $164 $10,167

Tactics for Paying Off Credit Card Debt

Those who carry the most credit card debt will have a harder time paying off credit card balances and will pay more interest in the process of doing so. Still, considering the potential for future rate increases based on the Federal funds or prime rates, paying off credit card debt sooner rather than later will be beneficial.

Use a Balance Transfer Card

Consolidating debt with a balance transfer credit card can make it easier to pay off high interest rate balances. The best balance transfer credit cards have long 0% interest promotional periods and even extend the promotional rate to new purchases. During the promotional period, you won't have any finance charges added to your balance so your payments are more effective. The danger is in running up a large balance with the false feeling of "easy money" and then facing escalating interest payments. Also, this only works if you stop using the credit cards you paid off with the 0% offer.

Pay More Than the Minimum

Paying more toward balances each month is another strategy for paying off credit card debt faster because the amount of interest that compounds is lower.

Focus on One Card

Pay the most on the card that has the highest interest rate and only the minimum payment for the others until that one is paid off. Continue this process until all your card balances are paid off.

Cut Your Spending

Make a budget if you don't already have one and look at ways to cut each item so you could put the saved money toward repaying your debt even faster.

Key Takeaways

  • Credit card debt has historically been on the rise in the United States.
  • The COVID-19 pandemic has temporarily changed this trend, resulting in a spending decline in 2020.
  • Interest rates are pegged to the Federal funds and prime rates.
  • The longer you take to pay off a card, the more additional interest you will accrue.

Article Sources

  1. WalletHub. "Credit Card Debt Study." Accessed Sept. 26, 2020.

  2. CreditCards.com. "Average Credit Card Interest Rates: Week of September 23, 2020." Accessed Sept. 26, 2020.

  3. Chamber of Commerce. "Credit Card Debt by State." Accessed Sept. 26, 2020.