Student Resume Examples and Templates

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Resume examples and templates are extremely helpful, especially when you are writing one of your first resumes. They provide you with a format for writing your own resume, and help you understand what information to include.

Below are a variety of sample resumes and resume templates for high school students, college students, and recent graduates seeking employment.

Sample High School and College Student Resumes

Resume Templates: Use these templates to see how to lay out your resume, and get insight into which sections to include and how to order the sections.

Sample High School Resumes: Whether you have no work experience or a few part-time jobs, use these samples to create your own resume as a high school student or recent graduate.

Sample College / Entry-Level Resumes: There are lots of possibilities for a college student or recent graduate's resume. Let your own qualifications and experience, as well as the requirements of the position, guide you in determining how to lay out your resume and what information to include. Browse the samples below for inspiration. 

Tips for Writing a Student Resume

When you're still in school or newly graduated, you may feel like there's not much to include in your resume. Most likely, though, you have more qualifications and experience than you'd initially think. Start by listing your education — if your GPA is strong or if you're on the Dean's List, include that information in the education section of your resume.

Even if you do not have a lot of work experience, you likely have participated in activities or volunteer work that can be listed. You may even have a hobby — for instance, writing a blog that is a review of every book you read or posting beautiful photographs online  — that could be relevant to your job application.

Here are some tips to help punch up a student resume:

  • Volunteer and campus experience: Haven't held a lot of jobs? That's not necessarily a problem if you've ever volunteered or been involved with an on-campus organizations, such as the student newspaper, an a cappella group, an LGBT group, or anything else. Emphasize any leadership roles you have played, and any accomplishments made or skills developed that might relate to your career needs in your description of these roles. Involvement in sports or a sorority or fraternity can also be included, especially if it can be framed to show off leadership skills or your ability to work well in a team.
  • Relate your abilities to jobs: Look carefully at the jobs you want, and develop your resume with the positions in mind. (Here's information on how to decode a job posting.) If the position calls for programming knowledge, you can call out your relevant coursework in a qualifications section. Or, if the ability to be organized and reliable pops up in the job ad, you can make sure those skills are emphasized in your job descriptions on your resume.
  • List honors and skills: If you've received any awards, you can break out an honors section to list them. You can also have a skills section where you list soft skills as well as any programs, languages, or certifications you have. 

When you're first getting started writing a resume as a student, include as much information as possible. You can always edit it down later! Aim to have your resume be a single page — longer than that is excessive for someone just starting out in a career. Proofread carefully since grammatical errors and typos will make you look unprofessional and underqualified. (Use this resume proofreading checklist to help catch errors.)

What Else You Need to Know:

Please Note: These samples are provided for guidance only.

The provided information, including samples and examples, is not guaranteed for accuracy or legality. Letters and other correspondence should be edited to fit your personal situation.

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