Sales Tax Holidays

Opportunities to buy stuff without paying sales tax in 2015

Sales tax holidays offer consumers a chance to make tax-free purchases at designated times during the year. During these special sales tax holidays, shoppers can purchase certain exempt items without paying state sales tax, although local sales taxes may still apply.

Many sales tax holidays are aimed at back-to-school shoppers, while others are designed to encourage energy-efficient purchases or early preparation for hurricane season.

The following states have announced sales tax holidays during the year 2015.

Alabama

Waterfall in Desoto State Park, Fort Payne, Alabama
Desoto State Park, Fort Payne. © Carol M. Highsmith / Buyenlarge / Getty Images
  • February 20-22: Supplies related to preparing for severe weather are exempt from state sales tax. Items costing $60 or less per item such as batteries, radios, flashlights, food storage, can openers, and smoke detectors. Also exempt are portable generators and power cords priced $1,000 or less.
  • August 7-9: Clothing and footwear selling for up to $100 per item, computers and software selling for up to $750, school supplies selling for up to $50, and books selling for up to $30 are all exempt from state sales tax. Local sales tax may apply.

Arkansas

Lee Creek Bridge at Devil's Den State Park, West Fork, Arkansas. Photo by Doug Wertman.
Doug Wertman / flickr

August 1-2: Clothing and footwear selling for up to $100 per item; clothing accessories and cosmetics selling for up to $50; school supplies, art supplies, and instructional material such as reference books and textbooks.

Connecticut

New Haven Lighthouse, New Haven, Connecticut. Photo by Tony Fisher / flickr.
Tony Fischer / flickr

August 16-22: Clothing and footwear selling for less than $100 per item are exempt from sales tax. Connecticut's sales tax holiday runs from the third Sunday in August through the following Saturday.

Florida

Silver Springs State Park, Ocala, Florida. Photo by Kid Cowboy / flickr.
Kid Cowboy / flickr

August 7 – 16: Clothing, footwear, and accessories priced at $100 or less each; school and office supplies priced at $15 or less for each item are exempt from Florida's sales tax and the local option tax. Sales tax also is not charged on the first $750 of the sales price of computers and computer accessories – which includes tablets, e-readers, printers, and monitors. [pdf link]

Georgia

Oceana Falls, Tallulah Gorge State Park, Georgia. Photo by Oliver Gerhard / Getty Images.
© Oliver Gerhard / Getty Images
  • July 31 – August 1: Clothing and footwear selling for $100 or less per item, computers selling for $1,000 or less, and school and office supplies selling for $20 or less are exempt from the sales tax. [pdf link]
  • October 2—5: Energy Star and WaterSense products priced at $1,500 or less for each item. [pdf link]

Iowa

Big Creek Lake State Park, Iowa. Photo by Panoramic Images / Getty Images.
© Panoramic Images / Getty Images

August 1-2: Clothing and footwear selling for up to $100 is exempt from the sales tax.

Louisiana

Hodges Gardens State Park, Louisiana. Photo by Ron and Patty Thomas / Photographer's Choice / Getty.
© Ron and Patty Thomas / Photographer's Choice / Getty Images
  • May 30 – 31: hurricane preparedness items on the first $1,500 of purchase price on items such as flashlights, radios, and batteries.
  • August 7 – 8: All tangible personal property selling for up to $2,500 is exempt from the sales tax, except for vehicles, prepared food items, and items to be used for a business, trade, or profession. If an item costs more than $2,500, the first $2,500 of purchase price is exempt from state sales tax. The sales tax exemption applies only to state-level sales tax. Sales taxes imposed by parishes and local jurisdictions may still apply.
  • September 4 – 6: Hunting supplies, firearms, and ammunition are exempt from state sales tax. Hunting supplies include such things as animal feed, bows and arrows, and binoculars.

Maryland

Green Ridge State Forest, Maryland. Photo by Edwin Remsberg / Moment Open / Getty Images.
© Edwin Remsberg / Moment Open / Getty Images
  • August 9 – 15: Clothing and footwear priced at $100 or less per item are exempt from the sales tax.
  • February 13 – 15, 2016: Solar water heaters and Energy Star products including air conditioners, washers and dryers, furnaces, heat pumps, refrigerators, light bulbs, and dehumidifiers are exempt from Maryland's 6% sales tax.

Massachusetts

Walden Pond State Reservation, Concord, Massachusetts. Photo by Fuse / Getty Images.
© Fuse / Getty Images

August 15 – 16: Personal property that costs $2,500 or less per item is exempt from sales tax. The following items, however, are excluded from the sales tax holiday: motor vehicles, motorboats, meals, telecommunications services, gas, steam, electricity, tobacco products and any single item whose price is more than $2,500.

Mississippi

Tishomingo State Park, Mississippi. Photo by Visit Mississippi / flickr.
Visit Mississippi / flickr

July 31 – August 1: Clothing and footwear selling for $100 or less per item are exempt. Clothing accessories are not eligible. The cities of Enterprise and Heidelberg are not participating in the sales tax holiday.

Missouri

Ha Ha Tonka State Park, Camdenton, Missouri. Photo by altrendo nature / Getty Images.
© altrendo nature / Getty Images
  • April 19 – 25: Energy Star certified appliances such as washers and dryers, water heaters, dishwashers, overs, air conditioners, furnaces, refrigerators, freezers, trash compactors and heat pumps are exempt from state sales tax.
  • August 7 – 9: Clothing priced for $100 or less, school supplies priced $50 or less, software costing up to $350, computers and peripherals priced up to $3,500.

New Mexico

City of Rocks State Park, Faywood, New Mexico. Photo by altrendo travel / Getty Images.
© altrendo travel / Getty Images

August 7 – 9: Clothing and shoes sold for less than $100, computers and tablets selling for up to $1,000, computer accessories priced for no more than $500, and school supplies priced under $30 are all exempt from the sales tax.

Oklahoma

Roman Nose State Park, Watonga, Oklahoma. Photo by John Elk / Lonely Planet Images / Getty Images.
© John Elk / Lonely Planet Images / Getty Images

August 7 – 9: Clothing and shoes priced at less than $100 per item are exempt from the sales tax.

South Carolina

Myrtle Beach State Park, South Carolina. Photo by Sterling Stevens / E+ / Getty Images.
© Sterling Stevens / E+ / Getty Images

August 7 – 9: Clothing, accessories, shoes, school supplies, computers, software, computer accessories, and household linens are all tax exempt. Additional details available in the South Carolina Information Letter #15-17 [pdf link].

Tennessee

Fall Creek Falls State Park, Tennessee. Photo by Curtis Photography / Moment Open / Getty Images.
© Curtis Photography / Moment Open / Getty Images

August 7 – 9: Clothing and school supplies selling for up to $100 each and computers selling for up to $1,500 are exempt from the sales tax.

Texas

Big Bend Ranch State Park, Texas. Photo by Witold Skrypczak / Lonely Planet Images / Getty Images.
© Witold Skrypczak / Lonely Planet Images / Getty Images
  • May 23 – 25: Energy Star products including air conditioners ($6,000 or less), refrigerators ($2,000 or less), ceiling fans, light bulbs, washers, dishwashers, dehumidifiers and thermostats.
  • August 7 – 9: Clothing, shoes, backpacks, and school supplies selling for $100 or less per item are tax-exempt.

Virginia

Douthat State Park, Millboro, Virginia. Photo by vastateparksstaff / flickr.
vastateparksstaff / flickr

August 7 – 9: New for 2015, Virginia has combined its three sales tax holidays into one. The following types of purchases are exempt from sales tax: school supplies ($20 or less), clothing and shoes ($100 or less), portable generators (priced up to $1,000), chainsaws (up to $350),  other chainsaw accessories and hurricane preparedness supplies (up to $60), and EnergyStar and Water Sense items (up to $2,500) such as refrigerators, dishwashers, air conditioners, sink faucets, and toilets.

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