How to Prepare for Your Upcoming Web Development Interview

Have a big interview coming up? Get ready for it here.

Young businesswoman conducting interviews at job fair
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You’ve got the job interview. The hard part is over!

Or is it?

Interviewing as a web developer isn’t the same as other job interviews. Most coding-based interviews follow a similar format that tests your knowledge. And these may be a bit more in-depth than what you are used to.

Here are four tips to help you get ready for your web development interview.

Interview Tip #1: Brush up on your HTML/CSS/JS knowledge

No, it’s not a test...but it sort of is at the same time.

Employers want people are who are confident in their knowledge of various web development languages. If you feel shaky in certain aspects of your given language, study, study, study.

Make sure you’ve got a few good responses for common coding interview questions, like a few below from this Web Development GitHub:

  • What does a doctype do?

  • The 'C' in CSS stands for Cascading. How is priority determined in assigning styles (a few examples)? How can you use this system to your advantage?

  • Explain how “this” works in JavaScript.

If you feel you can confidently answer these questions, then you should be solid.

Interview Tip #2: Provide a solution, then optimize it

Oftentimes in interviews, you are asked tricky questions. When you find yourself in this situation, don’t worry about the first answer being perfect. 

Instead, provide your solution, and then continually improve it to make up for the problems you encounter along the way.

No job interviewers seek perfection on the first try; you shouldn’t either.

An example question that could come up, related to this, (again, from GitHub):

What are some ways you may improve your website's scrolling performance?

Interview Tip #3: Make sure your portfolio is up to snuff

Check your portfolio before meeting your interviewer:

Is it usable by the widest possible audience?

Such as:

  • Less than ideally abled persons
  • Non-English speaking persons
  • Tech newbies

If your website design requires instructions to use it, it’s probably too complicated for a wide audience.

Employers like to see people who can design visually appealing, but usable websites. By thinking ahead and adapting designs accordingly for different users, you show your potential employer that you can think of all possible users instead of just one small group.

Possible questions involving your portfolio (from Interview Questions to Ask Web Designers):

  • Which project are you most proud of?
  • What would you like to show off?How did you know when this was finished?

Interview Tip #4: Don’t be afraid to ask questions

Just like the second tip: a job interview is basically like a test meeting at this job.

No one expects you to completely understand everything that is being asked of you from the start, so don’t be afraid to ask for clarification. You would be asking these sorts of questions every day, anyway.

Which is perfectly acceptable!

Conclusion

If you brush up on your knowledge and follow these tips, you will feel confident in your interview.

And confidence is what truly matters.

Employers want to hire a candidate who feels at ease talking about their work. Meaning you should be one of those people.

In the end, relax. Let your knowledge and training do the talking, and you’ll do it just fine.