NAVAL AVIATION - PILOT (AOC) - Qualification Factors

OVERVIEW:

Age: At least 19 and less than 27 at time of commission. Waiver up to 48 months for prior AD service.

Education:

- BA/BS in any major.
- No restrictions, but technical degrees preferred.
- Min 2.0 GPA

Training:

- OCS (12 wks)
- API Basic/Intermediate Advanced Winged (18-24 mo)
- FRS (6-12 mo)

Vision/Med:

- 20/40 max uncorrected, correctable to 20/20 (waivers NOT considered).

Phorias: No obvious Heterotropia or Symptomatic Heterophoria.

Refraction: < ±6.00 sphere; < -3.00 cylinder.

    - Color vision required.
    - Depth perception required.
    - PRK only eye surgery waivable.

    LASIK not waivable for aviation, SPECWAR or SPECOPS. PRK and LASIK not waivable​ for any community if pre-surgery refraction exceeds specifications shown above.

      Professional: N/A

      Service Obligation: 8 yrs Active Duty from earning wings.

      Special Info:

      - Must be within anthropometric limits. No waivers.
      - Height restrictions: 62" - 78" (male) 58" - 78" (female) (Note: * applicants under 63" will not likely pass anthropometric measurements)
      - Applications will only be considered if available for OCS within 18 months unless applying for BDCP.
      - Should be able to swim prior to OCS.
      - Flight pay during training = $125/mo.

      ANTHROPOMETRIC MEASUREMENTS:

      In order to lower attrition rates and provide better quality applicants for Officer Candidate School and follow on training pipelines, CNRC is working closely with aviation community representatives in all areas.

      One particular area of concern is the anthropometrics measurements of pilots and naval flight officers. A strict process is used in Pensacola to measure applicants in order to determine which air frames they may qualify to fly. These measurements are based on several factors including height, weight, functional reach, buttocks knee length, and sitting height which is used to ensure the aviator's safety on sitting in the cockpit as well as emergency ejections.

      These measurements include everything we have measured previously with the exception of buttock leg length. After studying the data the aviation community has come up with more accurate guidelines to apply for measurement ranges. The following are the accepted guidelines that should ensure compatibility with all pipelines. For applicants who may be close to limits, I have access to the anthropometrics website to enter data directly to check measurements. For qualified applicants who are possible selects who are close to limits, ​we may also explore the option of sending them to Pensacola to check their measurements first hand.

      FOR MALE SNA:

      1. Thumb-tip Reach FR: 29.5 inches or greater
      2. Buttock Knee Length: greater than 22 inches, but less than 26.5 inches
      3. Sitting Height: greater than 34 inches, but less than 38.8 inches

      FOR FEMALE SNA:

      1. Thumb-tip Reach FR: 29.5 inches or greater
      2. Buttock Knee Length: greater than 22 inches, but less than 26.5 inches
      3. Sitting Height: greater than 33.5 inches, but less than 38.8 inches

      FOR SNFO (MALE OR FEMALE):

      1. Thumb-tip Reach FR: 27.5 inches or greater
      2. Buttock Knee Length: 20.5 inches or greater
      3. Sitting Height: 32 inches or greater

      The following guidelines give directions as far as height concerns.

      Generally an applicant between 66" and 74" will be compatible for all pipelines.

      FOR SNA:

      1. IF 64 INCHES OR GREATER, BUT LESS THAN 76 INCHES:

      - MOST LIKELY ANTHROPOMETRICALLY COMPATIBLE WITH AT LEAST TWO PIPELINES (SOMETIMES THREE)

      2. IF GREATER THAN 76 INCHES, BUT LESS THAN 78 INCHES:

      - MOST LIKELY ANTHROPOMETRICALLY COMPATIBLE WITH ONLY ONE PIPELINE (NORMALLY PROPS), BUT POSSIBLY TWO PIPELINES (DEPENDS ON SITTING HT).

      3. IF LESS THAN 64 INCHES:

      · SAFE ANTHROPOMETRICS COMPATIBILITY WITH ANY PIPELINE IS HIGHLY UNLIKELY!

      · INDIVIDUAL IN QUESTION SHOULD BE SENT TO NOMI FOR OFFICIAL ANTHROPOMETRIC MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION BY NASC FLIGHT PHYSIOLOGIST

      FOR SNFO:

      1. IF BETWEEN 64 INCHES AND 78 INCHES:

      - MOST LIKELY ANTHROPOMETRICALLY COMPATIBLE WITH TWO PIPELINES (PROP & JET), BUT POSSIBLE AIRCRAFT RESTRICTIONS SUCH AS THE EA-6B FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH SITTING HEIGHTS GREATER THAN 37.4 INCHES.

      2. IF BETWEEN 60 INCHES AND 64 INCHES:

      MOST LIKELY ANTHROPOMETRICALLY COMPATIBLE WITH TWO PIPELINES (PROP & JET), BUT POSSIBLE AIRCRAFT RESTRICTIONS SUCH AS THE T-2, F/A-18, AND EA-6B FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH FUNCTIONAL REACHES LESS THAN 27.5 INCHES (T-REX ARMS).

      Finally, weight limits prohibit any training for applicants over 235 lbs. This is due to the safety concerns of ejection seats. No candidate will be allowed to enter training who is over 235 lbs.

      PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

      Community Overview. Navy pilots are members of the select, highly skilled Naval Aviation team. The Navy maintains and operates more than 4,000 aircraft including carrier-based jets, land-based patrol and reconnaissance aircraft , transport planes and sea and land-based helicopters. The Navy offers the world's most advanced and extensive training for candidates who qualify as skilled aviation professionals in a high-quality organization. Civilians transition to aviation officers during 13 weeks of intensive academic and military training at Officer Candidate School (OCS), Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola, Fla. NAS Pensacola is famed as the birthplace of Naval Aviation. Established in 1914, it is often called the "Annapolis of the Air." Aviation training is conducted at the Naval Aviation Schools Command(NASC) at Pensacola. OCS is challenging, requiring hard work and long days to build confidence and pride. Upon successful completion of preliminary training at OCS, future Navy pilots, NFOs and AMDOs are commissioned as Ensigns. All Ensigns entering aviation programs will then complete a six-week air indoctrination course at NASC, Pensacola.

      Active duty obligation. Candidates will serve a minimum of eight years on active duty from the date of designation as a Naval Aviator. Candidates who do not complete the Navy pilot program will serve four years from the date they are disenrolled from flight status unless released by the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Manpower, Personnel, and Training).

      Training Pipeline following commission. As a student pilot, you'll learn basic airmanship skills, instrument and formation flying, and basic acrobatic maneuvers. You'll also master the art of solo flight, earning the qualification to move on to more demanding training in a specific type of aircraft. Your intermediate and advanced pilot training will occur in one of five naval air communities. These five "pipelines" are jet (strike), turboprop (patrol and reconnaissance), multi-engine jet (strategic communications), carrier turboprop (airborne early warning) and helicopter (rotary). The pipeline you are in will determine the specialty flying skills you are taught, such as basic air combat tactics, gunnery, low-level flight and carrier landings. You'll also learn land and water survival techniques - key aspects of the Naval Aviation challenge. You'll earn your much-coveted Wings of Gold when you successfully complete your advanced training. With your Wings, you'll join the ranks of the most respected aviators in the world-Navy pilots. Before being assigned to your first operational squadron, you'll join a Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) for training in the specific type of aircraft you'll fly in the fleet.

      Carrier Landings. One of your greatest challenges will come with your first carrier landing. You'll bank your plane into a sharp left turn, lining up with the carrier deck while you drop just the right amount of speed and altitude. It's "hook down, wheels down" as you approach the carrier flight deck at well over 120 miles per hour. As your wheels touch down, you'll throttle forward to full power; your tailhook grabs the arresting cable, slamming you to a complete stop. There's no feeling in the world to match your carrier landing - until you taxi your plane to the catapult for your first carrier launch.

      Helicopter Flight. As a helicopter pilot, you'll fly a variety of demanding missions from the decks of several different types of Navy ships. Your mission could be anti-submarine warfare or tracking potential enemy ships. Or you could be searching for underwater mines or flying vertical replenishment missions, transferring supplies from one moving ship at sea to another underway. And always present, is the instant, emergency requirement for search and rescue including flying over hostile territory performing Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR).

      Multi-engine Turboprops/Jet. As a multi-engine turboprop/jet pilot, you'll fly a variety of missions, from strategic communications to tracking and surveillance of submarines to collecting intelligence. Piloting a multiengine E-2 Hawkeye early warning aircraft could find you flying radar surveillance warfare missions from a carrier at sea or from a shore air station. Whatever plane you fly and whatever your mission, as a Navy pilot, you are an integral part of a highly skilled, results-oriented professional team.

      Locations of initial fleet assignments. Before being assigned to your first operational squadron, you'll join a Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) for training in the specific type of aircraft you'll fly in the fleet. As a Pilot, you may be detailed to various locations on the Pacific Fleet, Atlantic Fleet and overseas.

      Special pay/bonuses. Naval aviation officers receive aviation career incentive pay in addition to their regular salary. Student aviation officers receive $125 per month flight pay during flight training. The monthly amount of flight pay received depends on time in service and increases by hundreds of dollars within a few years to the current maximum of $840.00 per month. In addition, you may be eligible for a retention bonus at the end of your initial commitment, currently worth up to $245,000 over a 25-year career.

      Basic eligibility requirements. Applicants must be citizens of the United States. Applicants must be at least 19 years old and of such age that they will not have passed their 27th birthday on commissioning. Maximum age limit may be adjusted upward to their 31st birthday on a month for month basis for active duty and prior military service applicants. Applicant must have a Bachelor of Science Degree from an accredited College or University; have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. Major: No restrictions, but degrees in technical disciplines preferred. Mental: AQR 3/ PFAR 4/ PBI 4. The Commander, Navy Recruiting Command (CNRC) will endeavor to select candidates with the highest mental qualifications, accepting minimum scores only when market conditions or exceptional cases warrant. Physical: Must be physically qualified and aeronautically adapted in accordance with the physical standards established by the Chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (CHBUMED). Applicants must have 20/40 or better, uncorrected vision correctable to 20/20, normal color and depth perception. Active duty military members accepted as candidates must obtain an aviation physical exam from a qualified Flight Surgeon to determine aeronautical adaptability.

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