Informational Interview Thank You Letter Example and Tips

How to Write a Thank You Letter for an Informational Interview

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Did someone take the time to share information on his or her career with you? If you've just conducted an informational interview, it's always a good idea to send a thank you email message or note.

It's important to extend the courtesy of thanking, in writing, everyone who helps you with your career or job search. You'll not only be showing you appreciate the time, you will also be building a relationship which can help you as your career progresses.

Send your thank you letter (paper or email) within 48 hours of your informational interview. Review these examples of a hard copy letter and an email, then tailor them to fit your personal circumstances. Also review tips for what to do after an informational interview so you can get the most out of your experience.

Informational Interview Thank You Letter Example

Your Name
Your Address
Your City, State, Zip Code
Your Phone Number
Your Email

Date

Name
Title
Organization
Address
City, State, Zip Code

Dear Mr./Ms. Last Name:

Thank you for speaking with me today. Your insights were truly helpful and have confirmed my decision to gain additional work experience in the field before applying to graduate school.

I will regularly check the websites you suggested for job leads, and have already contacted the ABC professional association regarding membership.

I will follow up in the near future to let you know about my progress.

Thank you again for your assistance.

Sincerely,

Signature (hard copy letter)

Your Name

Email Example - Informational Interview Thank You Letter

When sending your thank you as an email message, put your name and "thank you" in the subject line of the message:

Subject: Your Name - Thank You

Dear Mr./Ms. Last Name:

Thank you for speaking with me today. Your insights were truly helpful and have confirmed my decision to gain additional work experience in the field before applying to graduate school.

I will regularly check the websites you suggested for job leads, and have already contacted the ABC professional association regarding membership.

I will follow up in the near future to let you know about my progress. Thank you again for your assistance.

Sincerely,

Your Name

  • Your Email Address
  • Your Phone Number

Follow-Up Thank You Letters

If your informational interview leads to a good job lead or a job offer, you should send a follow-up thank you letter to the person who gave you the interview. This will keep your connection active and it gives them kudos for their knowledge about the industry. As you start a new job, you need contacts when you are ready to step up to the next phase of your career. You may even be in a position to do hiring and ask your informational interview contact to recommend people to apply.

How to Get the Most Out of an Informational Interview

After completing an informational interview, it's important to think over the experience and identify how you would like to move forward given what you've learned.

Remember, the goal of the interview is to learn more about whether or not a particular company, job, or industry is a good fit for you. Setting aside time to reflect upon the interview will help you decide if it is a career path you want to pursue.

Reflect on the interview as soon after the interview as possible, when your impressions are still fresh. Consider writing down answers to some of these questions. Even if you only write down brief notes, writing may help you process your thoughts about the interview. 

Here are some questions to ask yourself when thinking about your takeaways from the interview.

1. What are the most important new facts and understandings that you have acquired? 

2. Do you think you would be satisfied with the situation your contact described?

3. Do you think you would be dissatisfied with the same thing(s) your contact described as dissatisfying?

4. What is your reaction to the number of hours and type of schedule (set/flexible) described?

5. What is your reaction to the stresses and anxieties of this occupation? Do you want to deal with them?

6. What do you think of the culture of the occupation and/or company (the work environment, the relationships between employees, etc.)? Does it sound like an environment in which you would like to work?

7. What do you need to do to make yourself a competitive candidate?

8. Have you changed your opinion of the occupation as a result of your interview?

9. What misconceptions did you correct?

10. Did any other big red flags come up about the occupation?

Related Articles: Questions to Ask at an Informational Interview