How to Check Your Credit Score With Chase, Amex, and More

Track your credit score for free.

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Free credit scores are extremely easy to find these days. There are several consumer credit websites that offer free credit scores; you just have to sign up for an online account. Many of the major credit card issuers also offer free credit scores—some even offer free credit scores to all consumers, even non-cardholders. 

You’ll get access a FICO or VantageScore from at least one of the three major credit bureaus. Since these services are free, you can sign up for more than one to get a view of your credit score across all credit bureaus.

Credit Cards Offering Free Credit Scores

While all of these credit score and credit report services won’t cost you any money, they will cost you some of your private financial data. For most of the services included here, the fine print notes that you are giving the provider “written” permission to access your credit report, in full, in accordance with the Fair Credit Reporting Act.  

American Express

American Express primary cardholders can access an Experian FICO 8 credit score, as long as there was enough account activity in the month to receive a billing statement. If you haven’t made any transactions in a month—say you paid off your balance a while ago and you haven’t used your credit card—you won’t receive a credit score. You can access your credit score by logging into your American Express online account. New cardmembers will be able to access their FICO scores within 24-48 hours.

In addition, American Express offers a free TransUnion VantageScore 3.0 (and access to TransUnion credit reports) for all consumers through MyCredit Guide. MyCredit credit scores update weekly.

Bank of America

Bank of America cardholders receive access to their TransUnion FICO 8 credit scores. You can login to your online account to access your free FICO score, which is updated monthly.

Barclays

Some Barclays cardholders get free access to their TransUnion FICO credit score by logging in to their online account. Check your credit cards’ terms.

Capital One

Capital One’s CreditWise tool gives all consumers access to their TransUnion VantageScore 3.0. Capital One cardholders can use their existing Capital One login information to access CreditWise.

Chase 

Chase previously offered a free credit score only to its Slate cardholders. Their newly launched Chase Credit Journey program offers a free credit score to all consumers—not just those who have a Chase credit card.

Creating an account will give you access to your TransUnion VantageScore 3.0.

Citi

Citi is currently the only credit card issuer offering access to an Equifax credit score—but only to certain credit card holders. If your credit card is eligible, you can login to receive access to your FICO Bankcard Score 8, which is updated monthly.

Discover

Discover’s Credit Scorecard gives everyone access to their Experian FICO 8 credit score. Your credit score is updated at least every 30 days when you login to your account.

USAA

Members of USAA can access their Experian VantageScore 3.0 each month through Experian’s CreditCheck service. You’re generally eligible for USAA if you’re a current or retired member of the military. Military spouses and close relatives are also eligible to join.

U.S. Bank

U.S. Bank cardholders can view their TransUnion credit score for free each month by logging into their online account.

Wells Fargo

Wells Fargo offers free access to the Experian FICO 9 credit score to primary cardholders. The credit score is updated each month and is presented along with tips to raise your score.

Taking Advantage of Free Credit Scores

Note that free credit scores you receive online may differ from the credit scores lenders pull to review your application. Lenders usually use a credit score specific to their industry, while online consumer credit scores are generic and for educational purposes only. Lenders also may use credit scores from one or all three credit bureaus.

A credit score is a snapshot of your credit history at a specific point in time. Credit reports, which provide the information to generate your credit score, change frequently. Changes to your credit report since your last credit score pull can also explain why your credit score may be different.

A free credit score is a great way to stay on top of how your credit score is changing, but purchasing an industry FICO score will give you a better look at what a bank will see if you apply for a major credit card or loan.