Federal Income Tax Rates for Tax Year 2011

The 2011 Federal Tax Table

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The federal tax table remained the same in 2011 as it was in 2010, thanks to the Tax Relief Act of 2010. This legislation extended the same tax rates to apply in years 2011 and in 2012 as well. 

There were six tax rates in 2011: 10%, 15%, 25%, 28%, 33%, and 35%. Those rates were scheduled to change as follows in 2011 until the Tax Relief Act was passed:

  • The 10% rate would have been collapsed into the 15% rate.
  • The 25% rate would have become 28%.
  • The 28% rate would have become 31%.
  • The 33% rate would have become 36%. 
  • The 35% rate would have become 39.6%.

These tax rate adjustments didn't happen, but there was one change: An additional rate of 39.6% was introduced, applying to incomes of more than $400,000 for single filers and $450,000 for married taxpayers who filed joint returns. 

Single Filing Status

The 2011 tax rates and brackets for single filers were: 

  • 10% on taxable income from $0 to $8,500, plus
  • 15% on taxable income over $8,500 to $34,500, plus
  • 25% on taxable income over $34,500 to $83,600, plus
  • 28% on taxable income over $83,600 to $174,400, plus
  • 33% on taxable income over $174,400 to $379,150, plus
  • 35% on taxable income over $379,150.

Married Filing Jointly or Qualifying Widow(er) Filing Status

Married filing jointly taxpayers and qualifying widow(er)s were subject to the following tax rates in 2011: 

  • 10% on taxable income from $0 to $17,000, plus
  • 15% on taxable income over $17,000 to $69,000, plus
  • 25% on taxable income over $69,000 to $139,350, plus
  • 28% on taxable income over $139,350 to $212,300, plus
  • 33% on taxable income over $212,300 to $379,150, plus
  • 35% on taxable income over $379,150.

Married Filing Separately Filing Status

Those who were married but filed separate returns were taxed at the following rates: 

  • 10% on taxable income from $0 to $8,500, plus
  • 15% on taxable income over $8,500 to $34,500, plus
  • 25% on taxable income over $34,500 to $69,675, plus
  • 28% on taxable income over $69,675 to $106,150, plus
  • 33% on taxable income over $106,150 to $189,575, plus
  • 35% on taxable income over $189,575.

Head of Household Filing Status

Head of household filers were subject to the following rates and brackets in 2011: 

  • 10% on taxable income from $0 to $12,150, plus
  • 15% on taxable income over $12,150 to $46,250, plus
  • 25% on taxable income over $46,250 to $119,400, plus
  • 28% on taxable income over $119,400 to $193,350, plus
  • 33% on taxable income over $193,350 to $379,150, plus
  • 35% on taxable income over $379,150.

How Marginal Tax Rates Are Used

Individuals can use tax rate schedules in a number of ways to help plan their finances. You can use tax brackets to figure out how much tax you'll pay on any extra income you earn. For example, a taxpayer in the 25% bracket would be taxed at that rate until he reaches the next tax bracket, earning income of $83,600 or more if he were single. If you earned $83,600 and picked up a second part-time job in 2011, earning $15,000, that $15,000 would be taxed at the 28% rate. 

You can also figure out how much tax you'll save by increasing your deductions.

A taxpayer in the 28% tax bracket would save 28 cents in federal tax for every dollar spent on a tax-deductible expense such as mortgage interest or charity.

NOTE: These are 2011 tax rates and brackets. They are not applicable for 2018 or 2019 tax returns. These rates and their income thresholds changed considerably with the passage of the Tax Curs and Jobs Act (TCJA) in 2018.