Dress Code

Your Dress Code Is a Guide so Employees Know What Is Expected

Two businesswomen in discussion in workstation
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A dress code is a set of standards that companies develop to help provide their employees with guidance about what is appropriate to wear to work. Dress codes range from formal to business casual to casual. 

The formality of the workplace dress code is normally determined by the amount of interaction employees have with customers or clients on sight.

In workplaces where some employees interact with customers or clients and others do not, an organization may choose to have two dress codes.

A more casual dress code is normally adopted for employees with no customer or client contact.

Depending on the organization, the dress code may be written in great detail, or in the case of a casual dress code, little detail is necessary.

Over the years, employees have seen a shift towards a more casual dress standard, even in industries that were previously very formal. Startups, in particular, tend towards a more casual dress code.

Why Dress Codes Are Important

In some professions, dress codes are  so strict you call them uniforms. You want everyone to know who the police officer is, for instance. If your company sends out plumbers or cable television installers, your employees are showing up in strangers' homes to do work.

A uniform identifies them as the person hired and not some random guy off the street who wants to look at your toilet. (Okay, not likely to happen, but still.)

In other jobs, dress codes are important because you are representing the company.

Employees that work at clothing stores are often required to wear clothes the store sells. Target requires khaki pants and red shirts so that their employees are easy to spot.

Fast food restaurants require a strict uniform so that it doesn't look like customers have wandered behind the counter.

For office jobs, the person who sits at the front desk might have a stricter dress code than the Chief Information Officer.

Why? Because everyone who walks in off the street sees the receptionist, but you'll only see the CIO if you have an appointment.

Many client based industries, like law firms and corporate accounting, have formal dress codes. No one wants to meet with a lawyer wearing a tank top and Daisy Duke shorts. A suit is the chosen outfit, for both male and female employees.

What you wear to work tells people a lot about you. Have you ever heard the advice, “don't dress for the job you have; dress for the job you want”? It's good advice because how people perceive you influences what they think of your work performance.

What about Casual Dress?

If you can trust television to be accurate, you can see the evolution of dress codes. Now? It's a much more casual world, and some famous heads of big companies dress very casually - Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook, for instance, who seems to live in a hoodie.

Even companies that used require strict, formal dress have largely softened. You're more likely to encounter someone in cotton pants and a casual shirt when you visit a Fortune 100 company than someone in a suit.

This is generally known as business casual and can vary greatly.

Some companies allow jeans in a business casual office, others require pressed pants. Some business casual offices allow flip-flops while some require closed toe shoes. (Of course, some closed toe shoe requirements are for safety reasons instead of just dress codes.)

Even if your company has no dress code, you still need an internal one. Sloppy is never appropriate - even if your job is feeding pigs. Don't push limits. If your dress code allows sleeveless shirts, don't push it to spaghetti straps.

A good guide is to look at a senior person of your gender and use that person as a guide. If the VP wouldn't wear a mini skirt, you probably shouldn't either.

Legal Requirements for a Dress Code

Companies can generally decide how they want their employees to look, with some very important exceptions. First, ithe dress code can't discriminate. Men and women need to have similar standards.

Second, it has to allow for religious accommodations if they are reasonable. Employers need to accommodate an employee whose religion requires him to keep his head covered, or to wear a religious necklace, unless there are extreme circumstances.

If you're writing your company's dress code, it's ideal to double check with your employment attorney before implementing it as policy.

Additional Resources About Dress Codes

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