Credit.com Credit Report Card Review

Credit score gauge
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Credit.com has a wealth of credit information and advice to help consumers. The advice is all free to you. The company makes its money through partnerships with credit card companies and other credit affiliates when you sign up for products through its site.

If you're like most consumers, you have a tough time understanding what your credit report means. Seeing the information is one thing, but understanding what it means and how it impacts your credit standing is totally different.

Credit.com's free Credit report Card can help you decode all the information in your credit report.

How Credit.com's Report Card Grades You

Your credit score is calculated based on five key factors: Payment history, debt usage, credit age, mix of credit, and inquiries. Credit.com's report card grades you in each of those areas using easy-to-understand letter grades. You don't have to guess whether you have too much debt or whether you've been paying on time. You'll get an A+ if you're doing great in that area and an F if you're doing poorly. This lets you quickly and easily see where you can stand to improve your credit score. 

The report card will summarize your payment history telling you the number of late payments you have on have on your entire credit report.

It calculates your credit utilization and lets you know how much of your credit you're using.

You'll learn your credit age, both the date you opened your oldest account and the average age of all your credit accounts.

The report card helps you understand whether you have a healthy mix of credit account types.

Finally, you'll see a summary of the inquiries made to your credit and how those inquiries are affecting your credit.

Benefits of Using Credit.com's Report Card

If for no other reason, you should check out the Credit Report Card because it's free.

There's no cost or obligation to you. You don't have to enter your credit card number, sign up for a free trial, or watch out for any hidden tricks.

After you've signed up, your Credit Report Card is updated every 14 days with information from your Experian credit report. So twice a month, you get refreshed information about how your credit's doing.

You'll get access to an educational credit score which can help you understand where your credit stands. As you work to improve your credit, you can watch how your credit score changes in response to the actions you're taking. The educational credit score isn't a FICO score, the score most lenders use.

Find out what's hurting your credit score. The letter grades make it easy to spot the areas where you could stand to improve. For example, if you have a low grade in payment history, you may need to pay off some collection accounts or focus harder on paying your accounts on time each month.

Competing Credit Report Services

More sites are offering similar free credit report, credit score and credit monitoring services. Between them all, you can get your credit in the best shape possible. CreditKarma.com offers free credit report and score from TransUnion and Experian.

CreditSesame.com, Experian. Quizzle, Equifax. Finally, you can get one free credit report each year from each of the major credit bureaus through AnnualCreditReport.com.