Truck Speed Limit Regulations by State

Why Do State Laws Vary?

Red truck on the road at sunset
Jetta Productions/Getty Images

In the United States, there are different speed limit regulations for cars and trucks per each state or jurisdiction — which usually means that the truck speed limit is lower than that of passenger vehicles (depending on various conditions). These specific speed limits are usually only applicable to large commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) such as trailers, buses, and heavy trucks, and depend on whether it is in urban or densely populated areas, as well as whether it is day or night driving.

Truck Speed Limit Laws: The Complete List

Highway speed limits can range from 35 mph (56 km/h) in urban areas to 85 mph (137 km/h) in rural areas. Typically posted in increments of five miles per hour (mph), truck speed limits are set by either the state or the local counties, municipalities or other local statutes. Many jurisdictions have speed limits that are lower for trucks (not light trucks or large passenger vehicles referred to as trucks). ​​

Below is an alphabetical list of the CMV speed limits (in miles per hour) by state for the United States of America. Be sure to check all posted speed limits and drive according to the conditions of the road. The information listed below is only general information and is only meant to be used as a reference. It should not be considered legal authority. 

Truck Speed Limit, in miles per hour (mph)***
StateRural InterstatesUrban InterstatesOther Limited Access Roads
Alabama706565
Alaska555555
Arizona756565
Arkansas706065
California555555
Colorado756565
Connecticut655565
Delaware555565
D.C.N/A55N/A
Florida706570
Georgia705565
GuamN/A*N/A*N/A*
Hawaii606055
Idaho706570
Illinois705555
Indiana655560
Iowa705565
Kansas757070
Kentucky656565
Louisiana757570
Maine757575
Maryland707070
Massachusetts656565
Michigan55-6055-6055-60
Minnesota7055, 60 or 6565
Mississippi707070
Missouri706065
Montana656570Day / 65Night
Nebraska756565
Nevada806570
New Hampshire65 or 706555
New Jersey655565
New Mexico756560-70
New York655555 with exceptions
North Carolina707060
North Dakota75 75 70 or 65 (4 lanes or less)
N.M. IslandsNone25None
Ohio706570 
Oklahoma757070
Oregon55 or 6555 or 6555
Pennsylvania65**65**65**
Rhode Island655555
South Carolina707055
South Dakota808070
Tennessee707070
Texas757575
Utah756575
Vermont655550
Virgin Islands405520
Virginia707065
Washington606060
West Virginia7060 or 6565
Wisconsin707070
Wyoming757565

Why Do State Laws Vary? 

Traditionally, states are responsible for setting speed limits. However, in the mid-1970s Congress withheld funds from states that had speed limits that were higher than 55 mph by passing the National Maximum Speed Law. This was done for a couple of reasons:

  • As a response to the 1973 oil crisis, to reduce gasoline consumption. This was done since cars were thought to run more efficiently and use less gas at a speed of 55 mph (this effect on fuel efficiency has been heavily debated.)
  • Thought to increase safety. But the impact on safety is unclear as studies and opinions of safety advocates are mixed when it comes to speed limits for trucks.

At the time, motorists widely disregarded the law and in 1987 the requirements were changed for rural interstates and then completely repealed by 1995. Speed limit choices were again up to the states and today, 41 states have some portions of the roadway system that have speed limits of 70mph or higher.

In rare instances, such as for West Virginia, speed limits are not set by law, but by the Commissioner of the Division of Highways. In Rhode Island, speed limits not set by law, but by state traffic commission. For more information on individual state speed limits or transportation laws, contact the State Highway Safety Offices in each state.

*Guam does not have any Interstates.The maximum truck speed limit is: 35 in rural area, 15 in residential areas, 15 or 25 in school zones.

**Based on an engineering and traffic investigation, Pennsylvania truck speed limit is 70 on specific segments.

***Table data was compiled from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS).